Today in History – Nellie Bly and her trip around the world in less than 80 days

A great piece published in 2014 about a forward thinking journalist in 1888 named Nellie Bly- the first woman to complete a trip around the world in just over 72 days.  I love her spirit when faced with adversity: “It is impossible for you to do it,” [her editor] told her. “You are a woman …

Fighting Terror with Terror- The Women’s Protection Unit (YPJ)

Have you heard of the Kurdish Women's Protection Unit? In Iraq and Syria - where humanity is fighting for survival - a small force of women has organized into an army.  Women who have had enough of being beaten, tortured, raped, enslaved, and victimized have organized in the Levant region against the Islamic States in …

The Life and Bizarre Death of “Necro-Entrepreneur” Locusta, the World’s First Known Serial Killer

Reblogged at The Milieux Project themilieux.org- Thank you for a great read- a very interesting piece of history.

Dirty, Sexy History

WDM27975 The Love Potion. Evelyn de Morgan, 1903.

Little is known about the world’s first serial killer, which is perhaps why accounts of Locusta’s death are . . . eccentric?

Here’s what we do know: Locusta hailed from Gaul, the outer province of Ancient Rome now known as France. Trained in herbs, she mastered the system of “patronage” and made a name for herself as a reliable assassin – or as Dr. Katherine Ramsland calls Locusta’s business, “necro-entrepreneur.” [1] To Locusta’s benefit, Rome brimmed with wealthy, would-be-patrons, eager to hasten the death of rich relatives. These clients also reliably bailed Locusta out of prison when events didn’t unfold per plan.

In AD 54, Empress Agrippina, the fourth wife—and niece—of Emperor Claudius, grew tired of her uncle/husband. She conspired with Locusta to murder Claudius in order to place her son from a previous marriage, Nero, on the throne. The Emperor, however, proved…

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Amelia Earhart and Failure

“Women, like men, should try to do the impossible, and when they fail, their failure should be a challenge to others.” —Amelia Earhart @aviatrix97 #bethechange

Be Bold, Be #1

The best career advice I ever received was from a coworker at a deployed location when I was contemplating how to prepare an evaluation on my performance. It was 2014, and I was the first female pilot in this particular office.  I felt like Veronica Corningstone from "Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy".  Guys were …